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Chickweed

Chickweed

Common Chickweed is a winter annual with numerous branched stems. It has white flowers in small clusters at the ends of the stems. Its presence indicates very low calcium, very low phosphorus, very high potassium, high sodium, and low humus levels.
Chinch

Chinch

These very small pests are often associated with open, sunny areas and may be as numerous as 150 to 200 insects per square foot. They actively feed on turfgrass with thick thatch that is exposed to full sunlight during periods of hot, dry weather from early July through late August.
Clover

Clover

White clover is a low-growing perennial with creeping stems. It has oval leaves and white flowers arranged in round heads. Its presence indicates high magnesium, high sodium, and high chlorine. Hop clover is a perennial with hairy-branched stems. It has altering leaves with three leaflets and numerous bright yellow flowers on long stalks. Its presence indicates very low calcium, high magnesium, low humus, and sticky soil.
Common Purslane

Common Purslane

Common purslane, a summer annual broadleaf plant grows rapidly in spring and summer that thrives under dry conditions, competing well under irrigated conditions. Purslane’s distinctive succulent foliage is unlikely to be confused with other weed species.
Crabgrass

Crabgrass

Crabgrass is a spreading summer annual. It has a seedhead with two to six finger-like branches. The best control for crabgrass is pre-emergent. Its presence indicates very low calcium, very low phosphorus, high potassium, high magnesium, very high chlorine, and low humus.
Cudweed

Cudweed

In general, cudweeds have basal rosettes and the leaves are covered in distinct fine, white ‘wooly’ fibers. While only some varieties of cudweed have this hair on the undersides of the leaves, others have this hair on all surfaces. Cudweeds overwinter as small basal rosettes, but in the spring usually grow an upright stem.
Cutworm

Cutworm

Cutworms are really caterpillars, moth larvae that hide under the soil during the day, coming out in the dark to feed on plants. Typically, they attack the stem of the plant, often of a seedling, consequently cutting it down.
Dalligrass

Dalligrass

Dallisgrass is a perennial with leaves that are smooth on both surfaces with a few long hairs at the leaf base. There is no pre-emergent control for dallisgrass. Its presence indicates low calcium, high potassium, very high magnesium, high chlorine, and low humus.
Dandelion

Dandelion

Dandelion is a deeply tap rooted, stemless perennial. It has deeply cut leaves and a single yellow flower at the end of each hollow stalk. Its presence indicates very low calcium, very high potassium, high chlorine, and low humus.
Decline

Decline

Turfgrass decline is a take-all root rot disease. Its initial symptom is a yellow patch ranging from six inches to three feet in diameter. There are no visible lesions on the leaves. A majority of the roots under the patch are lost. The patches may become bare and join together to form larger, irregular-shaped areas. It typically appears in late summer through late fall, especially in the southeastern United States. It is most severe during periods with intense rainfall.
Dollar Spot

Dollar Spot

Dollar spot symptoms are typically small, circular, sunken, straw-colored patches of one to two inches in diameter. With severe attacks, the individual spots may join together to form larger, irregular-shaped patches. Lesions may be seen on infected leaves. They typically have a reddish-brown to tan margin and will enlarge across the full width of the leaf blade. Also, multiple lesions may occur on individual blades which cause blighting of the entire leaf.
Dollarweed

Dollarweed

An erect summer annual with alternate, lanceolate leaves that have toothed margins. Fireweed is primarily a weed of pastures, abandoned fields, and some agronomic crops. Its leaves are elliptic to lanceolate in outline, approximately 2 to 8 inches long, and 1/2 to 1/2 inches wide. Their stems are erect, solid, and usually without hairs (though occasionally slightly hairy). Stems range from 1 1/3 to 10 feet in height. This weed grows in the thatch layer which is located above the pre-emergence controls, rendering such controls powerless to stop its growth. Soil deficiencies indicated by this weed include low calcium and phosphorous, high potassium and iron, and excess thatch. Correcting these deficiencies is the most effective way to prevent this weed from growing.
Doveweed

Doveweed

Doveweed is a summer annual weed that usually germinates later in the growing season becoming problematic late in the summer. It closely resembles a grass but upon closer inspection, you will find that doveweed has stems that root at the nodes and purple flowers that appear on short stalks in clusters.
Fairy Ring

Fairy Ring

Fairy rings are caused by many different soilin habiting fungi of the class Basidiomycetes. These fungi can cause the development of rings or arcs of deep green grass as well as unthrifty or dead grass. Fairy ring fungi do not attack grass directly, but break down organic matter in the soil. As a result, nitrogen is released which the grass uses, causing it to grow and develop a contrasting green ring. The mushrooms that appear after rainfall are the fruiting bodies of the fungus.
Fire Ant

Fire Ant

Fire ants usually reveal themselves by their sandy earthy mounds, which are usually more visible after recent rainfall. They nest in the ground looking for food sources: plant seeds, insects, earthworms, ticks, spiders, arthropod eggs and other sweets.

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